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9/11 Changed My Life: Here’s What We Still Have Not Learned

Tanya Thurman Sep 12, 2015

I know. 9/11 stuff. It's a complicated historical event. I've lived in NYC all my life and should speak about this day. We should all speak. Bear with me. I feel comfortable saying September 11, 2001 was the worst day of my life because of it's permanent consequences to my family, to the world, and it informed a lot of my decision-making thereafter.

I grew up in NYC and was 19 when 9/11 happened. My brother joined the military shortly afterwards, fracturing my family as I became vehemently opposed to the invasion of Iraq. I went from an apolitical existence to learning all I could about history, setting off a total transformation as I shattered ignorance and developed my knowledge. My entire life for many years was devoted to political action. Those who really know me from that time know the lengths I went, nearly ruining my life and also saving it, I believe.

I mourn many things that stem from 9/11. It was quite the struggle for my family as NYC went into both a psychological and economic depression that changed a lot of New Yorkers forever, most of us originals no longer live in this city as a result.

I deeply mourn all those poor people and the horror they went through that day in the Twin Towers.

I mourn how Bloomberg reinvented the image of NYC to attract wealth, making it impossible for families who built this city, young people truly on their own without the assistance of their family, artists and regular people to live here.

I deeply mourn the people of the Middle East and our absolutely ridiculous and shameful onslaught of destruction in their part of the world.

In just over an hour, at a time in human history, something weird and profound and dark happened in America.

But it isn't much different than what Native Americans, Africans, Palestinians, and the many others who carry perpetual tragedy in their histories have experienced, is it?

Please no more war.

No more terrorism be it the American who struggled in school and looked at the military as a way to have a life, or the Muslim who feels suffocated by generations of violence inflicted on their people, or the Israeli who is angry and worried about the future, or the government whose corruption and neglect force people to be refugees, or the cop who feels underpaid, under-appreciated, confused about the public and may be brainwashed by our culture and all the many, many others who suffer, and in turn, cause others to suffer.

Our enemies are the corporations and the politicians who protect them. Let's spend the next phase of human history dismantling this power.

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