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Iraq Antiwar Timeline

Chris Anderson Feb 2, 2007

antiwar2OCTOBER 7, 2002
As many as 20,000 people fill the East Meadow of Central Park in the largest antiwar demonstration, organized by Not in Our Name (NION), on American soil since the buildup to war in Iraq.

JANUARY 18, 2003

Antiwar demonstrations take place around the world. International ANSWER and NION jointly organize large protests in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco.

JANUARY 27, 2003

As U.N. Chief Arms Inspector Hans Blix address the U.N. Security Council about the failure to locate Iraqi weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), as 17 people are arrested at a demonstration in the bitter cold outside the U.N.

FEBRUARY 3, 2003

Five members of the “Pit Stop Ploughshares” enter into Shannon Airport in Ireland and use household hammers to damage a U.S. Navy logistics plane. The five, who could have faced 10 years in prison, were acquitted in 2006.

FEBRUARY 15, 2003
Millions of people protest the invasion of Iraq in more than 600 cities around the world. The event is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest protest in human history. The global turnout is estimated at 10-15 million.

MARCH 20, 2003
Explosions are heard in Baghdad at 5:30 a.m. local time. At 10:15 p.m. EST, Bush announces an “invasion of opportunity.” The war has begun. Tens of thousands of school students across the U.K. stage walkouts, and thousands of protesters across the U.S. flood urban centers. Protesters in San Francisco shut down large parts of the city, including the financial district. 1,025 are arrested.

antiwar3APRIL 7, 2003
Police preemptively arrest more than 95 people attempting to block entrances to the Carlyle Group in New York City.

APRIL 9, 2003
U.S. forces take Baghdad. While some Iraqis cheer in the streets, others are rounded up by the American military to help stage the toppling of a statue of Saddam Hussein.

MAY 1, 2003
President Bush declares an end to military operations in Iraq in his “Mission Accomplished” speech from the flight deck of the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln.

APRIL 28, 2004
Images of torture at Abu Ghraib are revealed on CBS News.

NOVEMBER 8, 2004
American and Iraqi forces invade Falluja, destroying large swaths of the city, in the bloodiest single battle of the war.

MARCH 2005
U.S. Army misses its monthly recruiting goal by 27% – the first time in more than five years the U.S. Army fails to meet a monthly target. In June, the U.S. National Guard misses its monthly recruiting target for the ninth month in a row.

MAY 19, 2005
Police arrest at least 16 activists during a protest of more than 300 people outside Halliburton’s annual shareholder’s meeting.

AUGUST 2005
Cindy Sheehan camps out for four weeks at George W. Bush’s ranch in Crawford, Texas, to protest her son, Casey’s, death in Iraq. The Bring Them Home Now Tour begins.
SEPTEMBER 24, 2005
Between 200,000 and 500,000 protesters organized by ANSWER and UFPJ march in Washington, D.C. to end the occupation. In the wake of the destruction of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina, Bush’s approval rating is at a historic low.

OCTOBER 25, 2005
U.S. death toll in Iraq reaches 2,000.

MAY 24, 2006
Thirty members of the Port Militarization Resistance group blockade Port Olympia, Wash. to stop a convoy of Iraq-bound Stryker combat vehicles making their way from the port to be loaded on cargo ships.

OCTOBER 11, 2006
A team of American and Iraqi epidemiologists release a study estimating the Iraqi “excess death toll” at 655,000, twenty times Bush’s estimate of civilian deaths in Iraq.

DECEMBER 30,2006
Saddam Hussein is hanged.

DECEMBER 31, 2006
The U.S. death toll in Iraq reaches 3,000.

JANUARY 4, 2007
Outside the pre-trial court martial hearing of military resister U.S. Army 1st Lt. Ehren Watada, Iraq Veterans
Against the War Deployed establish a protest camp called “Camp Resistance” at Fort Lewis in support of Watada.

JANUARY 16, 2007

A group of service members delivered a petition to Congress of more than 1,000 military personnel who oppose the war.

JANUARY 27, 2007
An antiwar march in Washington, D.C. draws “tens of thousands” of protesters demanding the new Democratic congressional majority stop the war.

[Sources: bbc.co.uk; wikipedia.org; thinkprogress.org; cnn.com; msnbc.com; infoplease.com; whitehouse.
gov; portland.indymedia.org; hist.umn.edu]