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King’s Final Battle

Jessica Lee Apr 11, 2008

The 1968 Memphis sanitation strike marked a seminal moment in the history of the civil rights movement as striking workers and their supporters mobilized a mass movement demanding both racial and economic justice. Arriving in Memphis on March 18, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. urged strikers in a speech to stick to their demands for better wages and working conditions, and recognition of their union by the city’s white power structure.

“So often we overlook the worth and significance of those who are not in professional jobs, or those who are not in the so-called big jobs. But let me say to you tonight, that whenever you are engaged in work that serves humanity, and is for the building of humanity, it has dignity, and it has worth. One day our society must come to see this. One day our society will come to respect the sanitation worker if it is to survive. For the person who picks up our garbage, in the final analysis, is as significant as the physician. All labor has worth.

You are doing another thing. You are reminding, not only Memphis, but you are reminding the nation that it is a crime for people to live in this rich nation and receive starvation wages. I need not remind you that this is the plight of our people all over America. The vast majority of Negroes in our country are still perishing on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.

Now the problem isn’t only unemployment. Do you know that most of the poor people in our country are working everyday? They are making wages so low that they cannot begin to function in the mainstream of the economic life of our nation. These are facts which must be seen. And it is criminal to have people working on a full-time basis and a full-time job getting part-time income.”

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